Greece

Euripides

Euripides
Euripides (/jʊəˈrɪpɪdiːz/; Greek: Εὐριπίδης Eurīpídēs, pronounced [eu̯.riː.pí.dɛːs]; c. 480 – c. 406 BC) was a tragedian of classical Athens. Along with Aeschylus and Sophocles, he is one of the three ancient Greek tragedians for whom a significant number of plays have survived.

Sophocles

Sophocles
Sophocles (pronounced [so.pʰo.klɛ̂ːs]; c. 497/6 – winter 406/5 BC) is one of three ancient Greek tragedians whose plays have survived. His first plays were written later than or contemporary with those of Aeschylus, and earlier than or contemporary with those of Euripides.

Apollodorus of Athens

Author
APOLLODORUS or Pseudo-Apollodorus is the name traditionally given to the author of the Greek work known as The Library or Bibliotheca, a compendium of myth sourced from old Greek epic and the plays of the Tragedians. The work was traditionally ascribed to Apollodorus of Alexandria, a Greek scholar who flourished in the C2nd B.C., but his authorship is now dismissed. The work is generally believed to be a C2nd A.D. compilation.

Aeschylus of Eleusis

Aeschylus of Eleusis
Ancient Greek tragedian, often described as the father of tragedy. Academics' knowledge of the genre begins with his work, and understanding of earlier tragedies is largely based on inferences from his surviving plays. According to Aristotle, he expanded the number of characters in the theater and allowed conflict among them; characters previously had interacted only with the chorus.