United States of America

Edwin Black

Edwin Black
Edwin Black is an American syndicated columnist and investigative journalist. He specializes in human rights, the historical interplay between economics and politics in the Middle East, petroleum policy, the abuses practiced by corporations, and the financial underpinnings of Nazi Germany.

L. Frank Baum

L. Frank Baum
Lyman Frank Baum was an American author chiefly famous for his children's books, particularly The Wonderful Wizard of Oz and its sequels.

Edward C. Banfield

Edward C. Banfield
Edward Christie Banfield was born in Bloomfield, Connecticut on November 19, 1916. He married Laura Fasano in 1938, who helped him produce the renown book, The Moral Basis of a Backward Society (1958). Banfield died in East Montpelier, Vermont on September 30, 1999. (Mrs. Banfield died in New York City on August 20, 2006.)

Stephen M. Bainbridge

William D. Warren Distinguished Professor of Law
Stephen M. Bainbridge
Stephen Bainbridge is the William D. Warren Distinguished Professor of Law at UCLA School of Law, where he currently teaches Business Associations, Advanced Corporation Law, and Mergers and Acquisitions.

Dennis T. Avery

Dennis T. Avery
Dennis Avery was a senior fellow with The Heartland Institute, director of the Center for Global Food Issues, and a senior fellow of the Hudson Institute. With Dr. S. Fred Singer, he was coauthor of Unstoppable Global Warming - Every 1,500 Years, which spent weeks on The New York Times best-seller list in early 2007.

Lawrence Auster

Lawrence Auster
Lawrence Auster (January 26, 1949 – March 29, 2013) was an American race realist conservative essayist who wrote on immigration and multiculturalism.

Ron Chernow

Ron Chernow
Ronald Chernow is an American writer, journalist, historian, and biographer. He has written bestselling and award-winning biographies of historical figures from the world of business, finance, and American politics.

Adam Gopnik

Adam Gopnik
A staff writer for the New Yorker since 1986, Adam Gopnik was born in Philadelphia and raised in Montreal. He received his BA. in Art History from McGill University, before completing his graduate work at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University.

Herbert Aptheker

Herbert Aptheker
Herbert Aptheker was an American Marxist historian and political activist. He wrote more than 50 books, mostly in the fields of African American history and general U.S. history, most notably, American Negro Slave Revolts (1943), a classic in the field, and the 7-volume Documentary History of the Negro People (1951-1994). He compiled a wide variety of primary documents supporting study of African-American history.

Spiro Agnew

Spiro Agnew
AGNEW, SPIRO THEODORE, Vice President of the United States; born in Baltimore, Md., November 9, 1918; educated in the public schools of Baltimore; attended the Johns Hopkins University; graduated from the University of Baltimore Law School 1947; served in the United States Army during the Second World War and the Korean conflict; practiced law in Baltimore; elected county executive of Baltimore County 1962; elected Governor of Maryland 1966; elected Vice President of the United States on the Republican ticket with President Richard M. Nixon on November 5, 1968; resigned as Governor of Maryland on January 7, 1969; inaugurated 39th Vice President of the United States on January 20, 1969; reelected Vice President, November 7, 1972; charged with accepting bribes and falsifying federal tax returns, pleaded nolo contendere to the latter charge in federal court, and resigned October 10, 1973; international trade executive; was a resident of Rancho Mirage, Calif., and Ocean City, Md.; died September 17, 1996, in Ocean City; cremated, ashes interred at Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens, Timonium, Md.