United States of America

Adam Gopnik

Adam Gopnik
A staff writer for the New Yorker since 1986, Adam Gopnik was born in Philadelphia and raised in Montreal. He received his BA. in Art History from McGill University, before completing his graduate work at the Institute of Fine Arts, New York University.

Herbert Aptheker

Herbert Aptheker
Herbert Aptheker was an American Marxist historian and political activist. He wrote more than 50 books, mostly in the fields of African American history and general U.S. history, most notably, American Negro Slave Revolts (1943), a classic in the field, and the 7-volume Documentary History of the Negro People (1951-1994). He compiled a wide variety of primary documents supporting study of African-American history.

Spiro Agnew

Spiro Agnew
AGNEW, SPIRO THEODORE, Vice President of the United States; born in Baltimore, Md., November 9, 1918; educated in the public schools of Baltimore; attended the Johns Hopkins University; graduated from the University of Baltimore Law School 1947; served in the United States Army during the Second World War and the Korean conflict; practiced law in Baltimore; elected county executive of Baltimore County 1962; elected Governor of Maryland 1966; elected Vice President of the United States on the Republican ticket with President Richard M. Nixon on November 5, 1968; resigned as Governor of Maryland on January 7, 1969; inaugurated 39th Vice President of the United States on January 20, 1969; reelected Vice President, November 7, 1972; charged with accepting bribes and falsifying federal tax returns, pleaded nolo contendere to the latter charge in federal court, and resigned October 10, 1973; international trade executive; was a resident of Rancho Mirage, Calif., and Ocean City, Md.; died September 17, 1996, in Ocean City; cremated, ashes interred at Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens, Timonium, Md.

Jacob Abbott

Jacob Abbott
Jacob Abbott was a congregationalist minister who was perhaps the most influential and prolific author of children's books in the mid-19th century.

Lewis Thomas

Lewis Thomas
Lewis Thomas (November 25, 1913–December 3, 1993) was a physician, poet, etymologist, essayist, administrator, educator, policy advisor, and researcher.

Thomas S. Kuhn

Thomas S. Kuhn
Thomas Samuel Kuhn was an American philosopher of science whose 1962 book The Structure of Scientific Revolutions was influential in both academic and popular circles, introducing the term paradigm shift, which has since become an English-language idiom.

Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr.

Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr.
Arthur Meier Schlesinger Jr. was an American historian, social critic, and public intellectual. The son of the influential historian Arthur M. Schlesinger Sr. and a specialist in American history, much of Schlesinger's work explored the history of 20th-century American liberalism.

William L. Shirer

William L. Shirer
William Lawrence Shirer was an American journalist and war correspondent. He wrote The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich, a history of Nazi Germany that has been read by many and cited in scholarly works for more than 50 years.

Edgar Lee Hewett

Edgar Lee Hewett
Edgar Lee Hewett was an American archaeologist and anthropologist whose focus was the Native American communities of New Mexico and the southwestern United States.

Robert F. Heizer

Robert F. Heizer
ROBERT FLEMING HEIZER was one of the preeminent archaeologists of the twentieth century. A longtime professor of anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley.